Sound Moves

It's true! Starting Monday, October 26th, the New York office will be located on the second floor of 35-10 36th Avenue in Long Island City, Queens (near Kaufman-Astoria Studios and just two or three short subway stops from Manhattan). We'll miss Midtown, but the new space will offer all sorts of additional accommodations:

  • More Room
    10,000 square feet to play in means more items in stock and available to demo.
     
  • Loading Dock
    Making your drop-offs and pick-ups easier.
     
  • Delivery Van
    Can't make it to the store to pick-up or drop-off? We'll have a vehicle for just those occasions.
     
  • Dedicated TV Studio
    More demos, interviews, livestreams, and video content.

Call or email us if you have any questions or concerns. We will be open as usual at 330 West 38th Street up to and including Friday, October 23rd and then be back up and ready for business at 35-10 36th Avenue at 9am on Monday, October 26th.

We're super stoked to have you see the new location, but, of course, we still have to get the shop from here to there, which is where you could give us a hand...

...the syntax might have gotten away from us on that one, but you get the idea! Starting today, drop by the 38th Street office during business hours to reap the benefits of our moving fire sale! Whatever you buy, we don't have to heft anywhere - you'll never find a more motivating incentive for great deals!

Who's Down with FCC?

The dreaded FCC auction looms ever closer, when we'll get to see exactly what parts of our precious wireless spectrum will remain usable by the film, television, and broadcast industries. Lectrosonics Technical Representative Howard Kaufman gives a current view of the situation in the video above and we wrote up a summary when the FCC adopted the relevant reports, but here's some quick tips for making your kit future-resistant:

  • Buy wideband wireless systems, such as the Lectrosonics L-Series and SSM Transmitter. You'll need access to as much spectrum as possible, especially if your kit travels widely. It looks likely that the spectrum will remain clearer under 600 mHz, so we recommend sticking to Blocks A1 and B1. B1 might be especially useful, since there's a good possibility of some spectrum being permitted around TV channel 37 (608 to 614 MHz).
     
  • Get a part 74 license. I know we say it a lot, but it's still good advice. Many of the protections will be in place only for licensed users and unlicensed users are likely to have to deal with interference in crowded markets, such as New York. Local 695 has a good guide to getting yourself a license here.

Stay tuned for more updates as we have them and feel free to contact us with questions.

Chasing Our Retail

Gotham Sound New York is hiring!

We're looking for an energetic sound person to join our sales team. This is a great opportunity to help customers find the right gear for their kit. Job entails communicating with customers to get them what they want when they need it. We are looking for people with a love for sound and knowledge of the gear.

If you're interested in hearing more, please inquire at [email protected]. Rate depends on experience.

Reading the FCC Tea Leaves

Yesterday's FCC meeting had two items of particular import to wireless microphone users:

  1. Public Notice on the incentive auction for wireless spectrum.
  2. Report and Order 14-165 concerning unlicensed (Part 15) and licensed (Part 74) wireless mic operation in the TV and 600 MHz bands

A third item, Report and Order 14-166, concerning other spectrum bands that wireless mics can operate in, was deleted from the agenda, and was adopted prior to the FCC meeting.

More about the auction and our best guess as to how this will affect licensed and unlicensed wireless microphone operators below the jump.

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